Thursday, October 23, 2008

Thousands speaking a foreign language in unison?

All of my posts are about Radiohead, so... this one is about Radiohead.

It relates, though. I found it interesting that in this video, which was shot in Milan [where very few speak English well and most speak none at all (one of many sources confirming this: http://russell.dyerhouse.com/cgi-bin/log.cgi?log_id=6)] that thousands of people can still speak/sing a foreign language in unison, regardless of whether or not they understand what they're saying (though, they know how it feels).

So, here are a few hundred people from Milan (many of which who don't speak any English) singing in English, in unison, if you are interested.

Lyrics if you're interested:
Karma police, arrest this man, he talks in maths
He buzzes like a fridge, hes like a detuned radio
Karma police, arrest this girl, her hitler hairdo, is making me feel ill
And we have crashed her party
This is what you get, this is what you get
This is what you get, when you mess with us

Karma police, Ive given all I can, its not enough
Ive given all I can, but were still on the payroll
This is what you get, this is what you get
This is what you get, when you mess with us
And for a minute there, I lost myself, I lost myself
And for a minute there, I lost myself, I lost myself

For a minute there, I lost myself, I lost myself

7 comments:

Scott Abbott said...

The image of people at a concert filming the concert with digital cameras brings up a fear I have -- of documenting what's around me rather than relating with it, whether it's nature or music.

Jorgen said...

I agree, Scott. Larry Harper said that he used to film Solar Eclipses when he'd go see them, but then realized that it totally took away from experiencing the eclipse.

Torben B said...

Perhaps this is my retort as an aspiring filmmaker, but for me, my experiences are often heightened by technology. The camera becomes an extension of my eye, opening up unsuspected avenues. A microphone and headphones provide access to minute sounds. i pay attention to light in new ways. My "frenzied" senses hone in on details. i'm not saying that this is always preferable, but it is one valid configuration. i love watching footage of Stan Brakhage working. The camera becomes the catalyst for discovery, leading him to even dip his lens in the river in passionate . Also, i'm not sure that this digital camera revolution is that different from holding your lighter in the air. It's kind of a digital aesthetic --- a new way to participate. Of course, i'm also the guy who carries a notepad and a voice recorder with me at all times, just in case. i like capturing fragments.

Torben B said...

Scott, this also reminds me of the beautiful pictures you often post on your personal blog. i'm sure happy you take those.

Torben B said...

And... i meant "dip his lens in the river in passion" :) Or maybe even better: "leading him to passionately dip his lens in the river." Or neither.

Scott Abbott said...

Jorgen and Torben, I'm conflicted about this, as I'm guessing you understand. When Sam Rushforth and I were writing our column Wild Rides, Wild Flowers for Catalyst Magazine, we found that making mental notes while riding for what we would write helped us see and smell and touch and taste better. But it also complicated the experience in some ways. Goethe felt so strongly about lenses as disturbing direct observation that he eschewed most scientific instruments.

theincrediblejulk said...

What Scott says here reminds me of a frustration I often have when I write. I get very frustrated with the interference of technology in the process. I am torn between my need for speed (which typing on the computer provides me) and authenticity (which I feel best when I write w/ pen in hand). I can genuinely say that my writing process is hindered by this virtually every time I write...